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Atomic and Molecular Physics

Content About: Atomic and Molecular Physics

Published: 02/20/2012 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Greene group has just discovered some weird quantum states of ultracold fermions that are also dipoles. Dipoles are particles with small positively and negatively charged ends. Atoms (or molecules) that are fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state — unlike the neighborly bosons that readily occupy the same state and form Bose-Einstein condensates at ultracold temperatures. The...

Published: 01/25/2012 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Incredibly sensitive measurements can be made using particles that are correlated in a special way (called entanglement.)  Entanglement is one of the spooky properties of quantum mechanics – two particles interact and retain a connection, even if separated by huge distances.  If you do something to one of the particles, its linked partners will also respond.

However,...

Published: 10/27/2011 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

There's something happenin’ here, what it is ain’t exactly clear -- Buffalo Springfield

Theorists Norio Takemoto (now at the Weizmann Institute of Science) and Fellow Andreas Becker figured that something was amiss when they first analyzed the details of what occurs when an ultrafast laser dislodges an electron from a “simple” molecular ion, H2+. Since H2+ has...

Published: 09/13/2011 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Physicists would very much like to understand the physics underlying high-temperature superconductors. Such an understanding may lead to the design of room temperature superconductors for use in highly efficient and much lower-cost transmission networks for electricity. A technological breakthrough like this would drastically reduce world energy costs. However, this breakthrough requires a...

Published: 09/01/2011 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Ye group has built a cool new system for studying cold collisions between molecules. The system is far colder than a typical chemistry experiment that takes place at room temperature or hotter (300–500 K). But, it’s also much warmer than experiments that investigate ultracold-molecule collisions conducted at hundreds of billionths of a degree above absolute zero (0 K). The new system is...

Published: 07/14/2011 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Theoretical physicists recently combined two powerful tools for exploring ultracold atomic gases: Optical lattices and Feshbach resonances. Optical lattices are crystals of light formed by interacting laser beams. Feshbach resonances in an ultracold atom gas occur at a particular magnetic field strength and cause ultracold atoms to form very large, loosely associated molecules. However,...

Published: 06/13/2011 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

There’s exciting news in the field of Efimov physics!

It’s been more than 40 years since Russian theoretical physicist Vitaly Efimov predicted a strange form of matter called the Efimov state in 1970. In these strange states, three atoms can stick together in an infinite number of new quantum states, even though any two of the atoms can’t even form a molecule. For a long time,...

Published: 02/23/2011 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Putting the brakes on a superfluid dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) just got a whole lot more interesting. Last year, the Bohn theory group explored what would occur in a dipolar BEC when a laser probe — think of it like a finger — tickled a BEC just hard enough to excite a roton. (see JILA Light & Matter, Summer 2010).

The roton is a strange type of quasi...

Published: 12/19/2010 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Plucking the two electrons out of helium atoms should allow researchers to study how they interact during a double ionization process — at least in theory. Recently, Fellow Andreas Becker explored whether an ultrashort vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulse could be used to probe the interactions of helium’s electrons during a double ionization in the presence of an intense...

Published: 11/29/2010 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The secret for reducing quantum noise in a precision measurement of spins in a collection of a million atoms is simple: Pre-measure the quantum noise, then subtract it out at the end of the precision measurement. The catch is not to do anything that detects and measures the spins of individual atoms in the ensemble. If states of individual atoms are measured, then those atoms stop being in a...

Published: 11/23/2010 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Fellow Jun Ye’s group has enhanced the molecular fingerprinting technique with the development of a mid-infrared (mid-IR) frequency comb.  The new rapid-detection technique can now identify traces of a wider variety of molecules found in mixtures of gases. It offers many advantages for chemical analysis of the atmosphere, climate science studies, and the detection of suspicious substances...

Published: 09/26/2013 - 12:21pm Type of Content: Video Gallery

Margaret Murnane is a Fellow of JILA and a Professor in the Department of Physics and of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Colorado. She received her B.S and M.S. degrees from University College Cork, Ireland, and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1989. She joined the faculty at Washington State University in 1990, moved to the University of...

Published: 08/17/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

In 2008, the Deborah Jin Group introduced a new technique, known as atom photoemission spectroscopy, to study a strongly interacting ultracold gas cloud of potassium (40K) atoms at the crossover point between Bose-Einstein condensation and superfl uidity via the pairing of fermionic atoms (See JILA Light & Matter, Summer 2008). Near the crossover point, the physics of superfl uidity in an...

Published: 08/17/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

When former graduate student Mingming Feng started his thesis project, his goal was to build and characterize a mode-locked quantum dot diode laser in Kevin Silverman’s lab at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Feng chose this lab (after consultation with his advisor Steve Cundiff) because Silverman not only does a lot of work on diode laser development, but also...

Published: 08/17/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Bohn group has just come up with an exciting, really complicated experiment for someone else to do. This is something theorists like graduate student Ryan Wilson, former research associate Shai Ronen, and Fellow John Bohn get a kick out of. In this case, they’re recommending an experiment to measure how fast a tiny blue laser would have to move through a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (...

Published: 07/08/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

If you want to understand how chemical reactions happen, the ability to monitor dynamic positions of atoms in a molecule is critical. There's a well-known laser technique known as coherent Raman spectroscopy that uses a scattering laser pulse to set atoms vibrating and then measures the color shift of reflected light to detect vibration patterns. This technique has been used as a molecular...

Published: 06/21/2013 - 4:45pm Type of Content: News

Stefan Mathias, a research associate in the Kapteyn/Murnane Group, has been awarded a prestigeous Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship. The fellowships are awarded to researchersunder age 35 as part of the Marie Curie Actions program of the European Commission. The fellowships are designed to enhance and develop human resources in the European Research Area.

Published: 04/08/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Fellows Deborah Jin, Jun Ye, and John Bohn are exploring new scientific territory in cold-molecule chemistry. Experimentalists Jin and Ye and their colleagues can now manipulate, observe, and control ultralow-temperature potassium-rubidium (KRb) molecules in their lowest quantum-mechanical state. Theorist Bohn analyzes what the experimentalists see and predicts molecule behaviors under...

Published: 04/08/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The cold-molecule collaboration has developed a method for directly imaging ultracold ground-state KRb molecules. Their old method required the transfer of ultracold KRb molecules into a Feshbach state, which is sensitive to electric and magnetic fields. Thus researchers had to turn off the electric field and keep the magnetic field at a fixed value during the imaging process. However, the...

Published: 04/08/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

When Richard Sandberg and his colleagues in the Kapteyn/Murnane group developed a lensless x-ray microscope in 2007 (see JILA Light & Matter, Winter 2008), they were delighted with their ability to obtain a stick-figure image (below) that was comparable in resolution to one from a scanning-electron microscope. However, they didn’t know yet that this was not all they had...

Published: 04/08/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Imagine being able to observe how a magnet works at the nanoscale level, both in space and in time. For instance, how fast does a nanoscale magnetic material switch its orientation? What if understanding magnetic switching might lead to the use of the spin of an electron rather than its charge to create new devices? A new method for investigating such possibilities is just beginning to be...

Published: 04/08/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Dana Z. Anderson group has developed a microchip-based system that not only rapidly produces Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), but also is compact and transportable. The complete working system easily fits on an average-sized rolling cart. This technology opens the door to using ultracold matter in gravity sensors, atomic clocks, inertial sensors, as well as in electric- and magnetic-field...

Published: 02/09/2010 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The race to measure the electron’s electric dipole moment (eEDM) is picking up speed across the world, thanks to graduate student Ed Meyer of JILA’s Lazy Bohn’s Ranch (i.e., John Bohn’s theory group). Meyer has identified more than a dozen horses, a.k.a. molecules and molecular ions, with strong enough internal electric fields to compete in the eEDM derby. Imperial...

Published: 09/29/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Anderson and Cornell groups have adapted two statistical techniques used in astronomical data processing to the analysis of images of ultracold atom gases. Image analysis is necessary for obtaining quantitative information about the behavior of an ultracold gas under different experimental conditions. Until now, the preferred method has been to find a shape (such as a Gaussian) that...

Published: 07/08/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The new molecules are as big as a virus. They’re ultracold. And, they’re held together by a ghostly quantum mechanical force field with the energy of about 100 billionths of an electron volt.

These strange diatomic rubidium (Rb) molecules are the world’s first long-range Rydberg molecules. They were recently formed in Tilman Pfau’s laboratory at the University of Stuttgart from an...

Published: 07/08/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The most peculiar and fragile "molecules" ever discovered are the weakly bound triatomic Efimov molecules that form under specific conditions in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). JILA theorists have now shown that such molecules can interact with an additional atom to form "daughter" molecules, which inherit many of their mother’s characteristics.

What...

Published: 07/08/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Monodromy literally means "once around." The term is applied in mathematics to systems that run around a singularity. In these systems, a parameter that describes the state of the system changes when the system loops around the singularity. Since monodromy’s discovery in 1980, mathematicians have predicted that many physical systems have it, including pendulums and tops as...

Published: 04/08/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Starting with ultracold atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate, it’s possible to create coherent superpositions of atoms and molecules. Fellow Carl Wieman and others have done exactly this. Recently, the Jin group wondered if it would be possible to accomplish the same thing starting with a normal gas cloud of atoms. To spice up the experiment, they included two kinds of atoms: neighborly...

Published: 04/08/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Understanding how molecules collide is a hot topic in ultracold physics. Knowing the number of times molecules crash into each other and what happens when they do helps theorists predict the best ways to cool molecules to merely cold (1 K–1 mK), pretty cold (1 mK–1 µk), or ultracold (< 1 µK) temperatures.

Fellow John Bohn recently decided to investigate...

Published: 04/08/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Greene group just figured out everything you theoretically might want to know about four fermions "crashing" into each other at low energies. Low energies in this context mean ultracold temperatures under conditions where large, floppy Feshbach molecules form. The group decided to investigate four fermions because this number makes up the smallest ultracold few-body system exhibiting...

Published: 02/09/2009 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

A while back, former graduate student Scott Papp, graduate student Juan Pino, and Fellow Carl Wieman decided to see what would happen as they changed the magnetic field around a mixture of two different rubidium (Rb) isotopes during Bose-Einstein condensation. They assumed that the interactions between the atoms would change. They also expected they would observe two distinct condensates at...

Published: 09/29/2008 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The mission to find the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) recently took a menacing turn. Chief Eric Cornell and his protégés were already hard at work characterizing the hafnium fluoride ion (HfF+). Their goal was to be the first in the world to complete the mission. In their choice of molecule, they owed a lot to JILA theorists Ed Meyer and John Bohn (a.k.a. Agents 13 and...

Published: 09/29/2008 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Jin and Ye groups recently crafted an entirely new form of matter — tens of thousands of ultracold polar molecules in their lowest energy state. The ground-state molecules are too cold to exist naturally anywhere in the Universe. But, like the Bose-Einstein condensates discovered in the mid-1990s, they promise to open the door to unprecedented explorations of the quantum world, including...

Published: 07/08/2008 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Jin group recently came up with the first strong experimental link between superfluidity in ultracold Fermi gases and superconductivity in metals. What’s more, this feat was accomplished with photoemission spectroscopy, a tried-and-true technique that has been used for more than 100 years to study solids. This technique has been instrumental in revealing the properties of superconductors....

Published: 07/08/2008 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

What happens to a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) when its atoms interact strongly? One possibility for large attractive interactions is that the condensate shrinks and then explodes, as the Cornell and Wieman groups discovered in 2001. Another possibility for large repulsive interactions is behavior analogous to that of superfluid liquid helium. If superfluid liquid heliumlike dynamics could...

Published: 02/09/2008 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

When the Jin and Ye group collaboration wanted to investigate the creation of stable ultracold polar molecules, the researchers initially decided to make ultracold KRb (potassium-rubidium) molecules and then study their collision behavior. Making the molecules required a cloud of incredibly cold K and Rb atoms, the ability to apply a magnetic field of just the right strength to induce a...

Published: 09/29/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

X-rays are notorious for damaging molecules, including those in our bodies. High in the upper atmosphere, X-rays from the Sun break apart simple molecules like nitrogen (N2) and drive chemical reactions affecting the Earth. For these reasons, it’s important to understand exactly how radiation interacts with, damages, or destroys specific chemicals.

Recently, Fellows Margaret Murnane and...

Published: 09/29/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

In the quantum world inside Fellow Eric Cornell’s lab, communication occurs across a two-dimensional lattice array of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) when atoms tunnel out of superatoms (made from about 7000 garden-variety rubidium (Rb) atoms) into neighboring BECs. This communication keeps the array coherent, i.e., the phases of all condensates remain locked to each other. But something...

Published: 04/08/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

It’s easy to make X-rays. Physicians and dentists make them routinely in their offices with a Roentgen X-ray tube, which emits X-rays every which way — just like a light bulb, which is nothing like a laser.

What’s hard is to make X-rays march in step in the same direction — in other words, act like a coherent beam of laser light. This year marks the 40th...

Published: 04/08/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

A second wave has appeared on the horizon of ultracold atom research. Known as the p-wave, it is opening the door to probing rich new physics, including unexplored quantum phase transitions. The first wave of ultracold atom research focused on s-wave pairing between atoms, where the “s” meant the resultant molecules are not rotating. In contrast, p-waves involve higher-order...

Published: 04/08/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Researchers from the Ye, Bohn, and Greene groups are busy exploring a cold new world crawling with polar hydroxyl radical (OH) molecules. The JILA experimentalists have already discovered how to cool OH to “lukewarm” temperatures of 30 mK. They’ve precisely measured four OH transition frequencies that will help physicists determine whether the fine structure constant has...

Published: 04/08/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

A Fermi sea forms at ultracold temperatures when fermions in a dilute gas stack up in the lowest possible energy states, with two fermions in each state, one spin up and one spin down. New analytic techniques for diving headfirst into the fundamental physics of this exotic form of matter were recently developed by graduate students Seth Rittenhouse and Javier von Stecher, Fellow Chris Greene,...

Published: 04/08/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Small changes in the quantum fluctuations of free space are responsible for a variety of curious phenomena: a gecko’s ability to walk across ceilings, the evaporation of black holes via Hawking radiation, and the fact that warmer surfaces can be stickier than cold ones in micro- and nanoscale electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). The tendency of tiny parts to stick together is a...

Published: 04/08/2007 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

JILA Fellow Dana Z. Anderson, JILA visiting scientist Alex Zozulya, and a colleague from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute postulate that the ultracold coherent atoms in a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) could be configured to act like electrons in a transistor. An “atom transistor” would exhibit absolute and differential gain, as well as allow for the movement of single atoms to be resolved...

Published: 02/09/2007 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Researchers are investigating a new kind of microelectronics called spintronics. These devices will rely on the spindependent behavior of electrons in addition to (or even instead of) conventional charge-based circuitry. Researchers in physics and engineering anticipate that these devices will process data faster, use less power than today's conventional semiconductor devices, and work...

Published: 02/09/2007 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Scientists anticipate that cold molecules will allow them to explore all kinds of exciting new cold-matter physics. For instance, cold molecules should be able to interact with each other over much longer distances than atoms. They often exhibit an uneven distribution of electric charge called a dipole moment. Unfortunately, the complicated structures of ordinary "warm" molecules means it is...

Published: 02/09/2007 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

JILA physicists are investigating complex and interesting materials, circuits, and devices based on ultracold atoms instead of electrons. Collectively known as atomtronics, they have important theoretical advantages over conventional electronics, including (1) superfluidity and superconductivity, (2) minimal thermal noise and instability, and (3) coherent flow. With such characteristics,...

Published: 09/29/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Does the electron have an electric dipole moment (eEDM)? If it does, the standard model of elementary particle physics says this dipole moment is many orders of magnitude below what can be measured experimentally. As Fellow John Bohn quips, "It's a darn small one."

On the other hand, various extensions of the standard model predict a much larger eEDM that might be just within reach of a...

Published: 09/29/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

What do fermions in atomic nuclei, neutron stars, and ultracold trapped gases have in common? They have the same fundamental behavior. The exciting news is that there's now hard evidence that this is true, thanks to graduate students Jayson Stewart and John Gaebler, Cindy Regal who received her Ph.D. in physics in November, and Fellow Debbie Jin.

Jin says that many of us might expect...

Published: 09/29/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Pancakes of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of polar molecules are repulsive and potentially unstable. However, the physics of these dipolar condensates is delicious, according to research associate Shai Ronen, graduate student Daniele Bortolotti, and Fellow John Bohn. The JILA theorists recently studied BECs with purely dipolar interactions in oblate (pancake) traps.

The researchers...

Published: 09/29/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Under ordinary circumstances, making new molecules can be simple and straightforward - just a matter of mixing together some highly reactive chemicals and letting nature take its course. However, when the reactants are a few millionths of a degree above absolute zero, the creation of new molecules requires the sophisticated tools of modern experimental physics. Using those tools, graduate...

Published: 07/08/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The fine structure constant is getting a lot of attention these days. Known as α, it is the "coupling constant," or measure of the strength of the electromagnetic force that governs how electrons, muons, and light interact. What's intriguing is that new models for the basic structure of matter predict that α may have changed over vast spans of cosmic time, with the...

Published: 04/08/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

There's only one way to prove you've invented a better atomic clock: Come out on top of a comparison of your clock with one of the world's best atomic clocks: The NIST-F1 cesium fountain atomic clock, the nation's primary time and frequency standard. NIST-F1 is so accurate it won't gain or lose a second in more than 60 million years.

That's the gold standard Graduate Students Andrew...

Published: 02/09/2006 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Imagine trying to describe the intricate motions of a single atom as it interacts with a laser. Then suppose you could generalize this understanding to a whole cloud of similar atoms and predict the temperatures your experimental physicist colleagues could achieve with laser cooling. This way-cool theoretical analysis comes compliments of Graduate Student Josh Dunn and Fellow Chris Greene....

Published: 04/08/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

One fun thing theorists do is undertake creative projects that predict phenomena that haven't yet been observed experimentally. In fact, sometimes they even predict things no one has ever imagined before. In other cases, the goal is to unravel the mechanism behind an experimental result that initially seems to conflict with the known laws of quantum physics. Fellow Chris Greene's...

Published: 04/08/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

JILA physicists are collaborating to explore the link between superconductivity and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of fermions at ultracold temperatures. Fermions have an odd number of total protons, neutrons, and electrons, giving them a half integer spin, which is either up or down. At ultracold temperatures, this means fermions can't just occupy the same energy level (like bosons, which...

Published: 02/09/2006 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

When molecules smash into each other, things happen on the quantum level. Electrons get shoved around. They may even jump from one atom to another. Spin directions can change. A chemical reaction may even take place. Since it's not possible to directly observe this kind of electron behavior, scientists want to be able to probe it with novel spectroscopies. Now, thanks to a recent...

Published: 02/09/2006 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Graduate Student Sarah Thompson, Research Associate Eleanor Hodby, and Fellow Carl Wieman have come up with a novel way to assemble Feshbach molecules from a cloud of ultracold atoms. The molecules consist of very weakly bound atoms that are about as far apart in the molecular state as they are in the atom cloud from which they are formed. Understanding the properties of these molecules...

Published: 09/29/2005 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Have you ever wondered whether a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) could spontaneously escape from the trap in which it was created? After all, physicists have known for a long time that the wave nature of single particles, such as atoms and electrons, makes it possible for such particles to tunnel through all kinds of barriers that are too high to climb (or jump) over. BECs also have a wave...

Published: 09/29/2005 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Scientists in Fellow Jun Ye's lab are developing a high-precision optical atomic clock linked to super-narrow optical transitions in ultracold, trapped strontium atoms. However, unless the new clock is portable (it is not) or researchers figure out how to accurately transmit its clock signal over a fiber optic network to NIST, the legendary strontium clock will not be able to help the world...

Published: 09/29/2005 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Graduate students Dave Harber and John Obrecht, postdoc Jeff McGuirk, and Fellow Eric Cornell recently devised a clever way to use a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) inside a magnetic trap to probe the quantum behavior of free space. To do this, the researchers first created a BEC inside a magnetic trap, whose shape (where the condensate forms) resembles a cereal bowl. Then as shown in the...

Published: 04/08/2005 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Markus Greiner, Cindy Regal, Jayson Stewart, and Debbie Jin have found the first-ever visual evidence of correlated ultracold atoms in the noise patterns present in images of an ultracold cloud of potassium.

The researchers split ultracold molecules into entangled pairs of atoms flying apart in opposite directions, as shown to the right. Then they used a laser beam to create a...

Published: 04/08/2005 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

A high-powered JILA collaboration led by JILA Fellows Jun Ye and Chris Greene is making important progress toward developing an ultrastable, high-accuracy optical atomic clock. The new optical clock design will use a variety of laser sources including a femtosecond comb and a diode laser stabilized with an optical cavity, which, in turn, is locked to a narrow energy level transition in...

Published: 09/26/2013 - 3:14pm Type of Content: Video Gallery

Dr. Deborah Jin was awarded the Science and Environment Medal on September 28, 2004. Jin created a new form of matter which could potentially unlock the key to superconductivity, a phenomenon with the potential to improve energy efficiency dramatically across a broad range of applications.

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