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David Nesbitt

Content About: David Nesbitt

Published: 09/26/2016 - 12:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Nesbitt group has invented a nifty technique for exploring the physics and chemistry of a gas interacting with molecules on the surface of a liquid. The group originally envisioned the technique because it’s impossible to overestimate the importance of understanding surface chemistry. For instance, ozone depletion in the atmosphere occurs because of chemical reactions of hydrochloric acid...

Published: 08/24/2016 - 2:28pm Type of Content: News

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has awarded David Nesbitt the 2017 E. Bright Wilson Award in Spectroscopy. The award, sponsored by the ACS Division of Physical Chemistry, recognizes outstanding accomplishments in fundamental or applied spectroscopy in chemistry. It consists of $5,000 and a certificate.

Nesbitt will be honored at an awards ceremony on April 4, 2017, held in...

Published: 05/11/2015 - 11:20am Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

A wildly successful JILA (Nesbitt Group)-NIH collaboration is opening the door to studies of RNA behavior, including binding, folding and other factors that affect structural changes of RNA from living organisms. Such structural changes determine RNA enzymatic functions, including the regulation of genetic information.

Yun-Xing Wang of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and his...

Published: 04/01/2015 - 12:21pm Type of Content: News

JILA graduate students Stephen Okoniewski (Perkins group), Jake Pettine (Nesbitt group), and Lindsay Sonderhouse (Ye group) have won coveted 2015 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships, NSF announced March 31. The five-year Graduate Research Fellowships provide three years of support, with a per-year stipend of $34,000 and cost of education allowance of $12,000. Tuition and...

Published: 05/22/2014 - 9:11am Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Biomolecules may not always behave the same way in test tubes as they do in living cells, a fact underscored by important new work by former research associate Nick Dupuis, graduate student Erik Holmstrom, and Fellow David Nesbitt. The researchers found that under crowded conditions that begin to mimic those found in cells, single RNA molecules folded 35 times faster than in the dilute...

Published: 04/17/2014 - 10:33am Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Graduate student Erik Holmstrom and Fellow David Nesbitt have applied their laboratory research on the rates of RNA folding and unfolding to the medically important enzyme telomerase. Telomerase employs both protein and RNA components to lengthen chromosomes, which are shortened every time they are copied.

If one short piece of the RNA in telomerase is folded into an organized structure...

Published: 08/26/2013 - 3:38pm Type of Content: News

David Nesbitt has been awarded the 2013 Pacesetter Award in the science category. For nineteen years, David has spent one Saturday each month teaching youngsters, who range in age from 8 to 17, and their parents all about the wonders of science. In 1994 he took over as director of the CU Wizards program and has greatly expanded the range of scientific topics.

The annual Pacesetter Award...

Published: 05/03/2013 - 1:53pm Type of Content: News

David Nesbitt has been elected as a 2013 member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He joins some of the world’s most accomplished leaders from academia, business, public affairs, the humanities, and the arts, including JILA Fellows Carl Lineberger, Eric Cornell, Margaret Murnane, and Deborah Jin, Fellow emeritus Carl Wieman, and such luminaries as George Washington, Benjamin...

Published: 04/09/2013 - 1:14pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Nesbitt group has figured out the central role of “plasmon resonances” in light-induced emission of electrons from gold or silver nanoparticles. Plasmons are rapid-fire electron oscillations of freely moving (conduction) electrons in metals. They are caused by light of just the “right frequency.”

In metal nanoparticles, the right frequency exquisitely depends on the shape of the...

Published: 08/17/2012 - 3:51pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The interface between a gas and a solid is a remarkable environment for new investigations. Lots of fascinating chemistry takes place there, including catalysis. Catalysis is acceleration of a chemical reaction that is caused by an element like platinum that remains unchanged by a chemical reaction. For instance platinum catalyzes the transformation of carbon monoxide (CO) into carbon dioxide...

Published: 08/17/2012 - 2:26pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The Nesbitt group has been investigating RNA folding since the early 2000s. The group’s goal has been to gain a detailed understanding of the relationship between structure and function in this important biomolecule. One challenge has been figuring out how unfolded RNA molecules assume the proper three-dimensional (3D) shape to perform their biological activities. To accomplish this, the...

Published: 10/18/2011 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Searching for Clues in Quantum Fingerprints

The Nesbitt group wants to figure out how chemistry works in outer space. In particular, the group wants to understand the “cosmo”-chemistry leading to the generation of soot, which is similar to products of combustion here on Earth.

“Outer space is full of molecules,” Nesbitt explains. “We want to discover how these molecules are...

Published: 08/17/2010 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

In microscopic studies of single biological molecules or nanoparticles, it’s useful to be able to precisely control the temperature around the sample. Until now, heating has required electric currents that warm up microscope stages, slides, and optics in addition to the specimen under study. Such methods are slow and hard to control, not to mention capable of accidentally altering the...

Published: 04/08/2009 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Quantum dots are tiny structures made of semiconductor materials. With diameters of 1–5 nm, they are small enough to constrain their constituents in all three dimensions. This constraint means that when a photon of light knocks an electron into the conduction band and creates an electron/hole pair, the pair can’t get out of the dot. In terms of quantum mechanics, this confinement...

Published: 02/09/2009 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Imagine being able to study how molecules form on the quantum level. It turns out that researchers have already figured out some nifty techniques involving lasers and jets of reactive atoms for doing just that in a gaseous environment. Now graduate student Alex Zolot, former Visiting Fellow Paul Dagdikian of Johns Hopkins University, and Fellow David Nesbitt have taken this kind of study...

Published: 07/08/2008 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

For many years, chemists have explored the differences between liquids and solids. One difference is that liquid surfaces tend to be softer than solid surfaces (from the perspective of molecules crashing onto them). Another difference is that the surface of at least one oily liquid (perfluorinated polyether, or PFPE) actually gets stickier as it gets hotter, according to a new study by...

Published: 09/29/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

If you want to "see" physical objects whose dimensions are measured in nanometers and simultaneously probe the electronic structure of the atoms, molecules, and surfaces populating this nanoworld, you just might have to invent a new microscope. In fact, that's exactly what Fellow David Nesbitt's group recently accomplished.

Oliver Monti, a former JILA postdoc...

Published: 07/08/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

"Chemistry is a highly improbable science," says Graduate Student Mike Deskevich, who adds "It's good for life on Earth that things are so unreactive." For instance, if chemical reactions happened easily and often, oxygen in the air would cause clothing and other flammable materials to burst into flame. In addition to making life difficult, high probability chemistry...

Published: 07/08/2006 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

The breakdown of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the stratosphere has been implicated in the destruction of Earth's protective ozone layer. Consequently, scientists have undertaken studies to better understand the structure and behavior of highly reactive, but short-lived, free radicals produced during the breakdown process. The molecules, which contain either fluorine or chlorine, are an...

Published: 02/09/2006 - 5:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Chemical physicists investigate the structure and behavior of atoms and molecules on the quantum level. Such research is particularly challenging when the molecule under investigation appears in small amounts and is rapidly transformed into something else, e.g., during combustion, chemical synthesis, or atmospheric chemical reactions. Happily, Research Associate Feng Dong, Fellow David Nesbitt...

Published: 09/29/2005 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

Brad Perkins and his thesis advisor Fellow David Nesbitt recently decided to explore what happens when fast, cold carbon dioxide molecules collide with the surface of an oily liquid (perfluoropolyether). Of course, you can only do these sorts of things in a vacuum chamber, where there are virtually no other gas molecules in the air to get in the way! The vacuum chamber itself creates an...

Published: 09/29/2005 - 6:00pm Type of Content: Article-Research Highlight

RNA molecules can perform amazing biological feats, including storing, transporting, and reading genetic blueprints as well as catalyzing chemical reactions inside living cells. To manage the latter feat, RNA molecules must rapidly fold into an exact three-dimensional (3D) shape. Understanding how RNA accomplishes this is a major scientific challenge. Former JILA postdoc Jose Hodak,...

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Published: 10/18/2012 - 3:28pm Type of Content: People - Faculty & Research Groups
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Published: 06/21/2013 - 2:09pm Type of Content: Awards
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Published: 06/21/2013 - 1:41pm Type of Content: Awards
Published: 05/12/2016 - 10:32am Type of Content: Biblio
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Published: 06/21/2013 - 10:11am Type of Content: Awards
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Published: 06/20/2013 - 3:03pm Type of Content: Awards

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