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Assessing the Cumulative Impact of Humans on the Landscape

Event Details

Event Dates: 

Wednesday, October 30, 2013 - 10:00am

Seminar Location: 

  • Duane Physics Room G1B20

Speaker Name(s): 

James Syvitski

Speaker Affiliation(s): 

University of Colorado Boulder
Seminar Type/Subject

Scientific Seminar Type: 

  • Physics Department Colloquium

Event Details & Abstract: 

Humans are changing the Earth’s biophysical system — atmospheric and ocean climatology and chemistry, extent of snow cover, permafrost and sea-ice, glacier, ice-sheet and ocean volume, and indeed the hydrological cycle.  Some changes are truly global, represented by similar temporal trends — atmospheric greenhouse gases, global surface temperatures, nitrogen fluxes to the coastal zone, and species extinctions. Striking is the extent and rate at which humans have modified Earth’s land surface; as just one example, humans are now the largest force in the movement of sediment — greater than ice, wind and water.  The traces of humanity (e.g. petroleum wells, geotechnical boreholes, mining-exploration holes, and deep-water wells) will last millions of years.  Historical deforestation and land clearing have greatly impacted soil erosion, hill slope failure and downstream sedimentation. In this talk, I will discuss how, by any measure, we have entered a new geological era (labeled the Anthropocene), unique to the history of our planet. Some of these changes have crept up on us; others have gone unrecognized until recently. Global sustainability involves facing our risks both global and local and aligning governance with stewardship.

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